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Post #1441 - 23 Jul 2020, 20:37

Sonofsmegma » Thu Jul 23, 2020 8:15 pm wrote:I'd get thrown out by the impact and land in the soft and bushy grass where the moat once was, pretty much unscathed.

Whereas you, in the driver's seat, as it's a bus, would be crushed.

Result! :devil:

Hardly likely, I've never driven a Leyland PD2/40. :huh:
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Post #1442 - 24 Jul 2020, 07:35

OMG, I'm getting very confused, could someone please just explain what the f@%k a bank holiday is in plain simple easy to understand english? please is that too much to understand or comprehend? good grief.
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Post #1443 - 24 Jul 2020, 10:08

righthard » Fri Jul 24, 2020 7:35 am wrote:OMG, I'm getting very confused, could someone please just explain what the f@%k a bank holiday is in plain simple easy to understand english? please is that too much to understand or comprehend? good grief.

In England, Wales and Northern Ireland, Good Friday and Christmas Day are common law holidays, having been customary holidays since time immemorial.[3]

Until 1834, the Bank of England observed about 33 saints' days and religious festivals as holidays, but in that year this was reduced to four: 1 May (May Day), 1 November (All Saints' Day), Good Friday and Christmas Day.

The first official bank holidays were named in the Bank Holidays Act 1871, introduced by Liberal politician and banker Sir John Lubbock. [3] Under the Act, no person was compelled to make any payment or to do any act upon a bank holiday which he would not be compelled to do or make on Christmas Day or Good Friday, and the making of a payment or the doing of an act on the following day was equivalent to doing it on the holiday.[4] People were so grateful that some called the first bank holidays St Lubbock's Days for a while.

The Act did not include Good Friday and Christmas Day as bank holidays in England, Wales, or Ireland because they were already recognised as common law holidays.[3]

In 1903, the Bank Holiday (Ireland) Act added 17 March, Saint Patrick's Day, as a bank holiday for Ireland only.[6] New Year's Day did not become a bank holiday in England until 1 January 1974. Boxing Day did not become a bank holiday in Scotland until 1974.

Starting in 1965, experimentally, the August bank holiday weekend was observed at the end of August "to give a lead in extending British holidays over a longer summer period".[7] Each year's date was announced in Parliament on an ad hoc basis, to the despair of the calendar and diary publishing trade.[8] The rule seems to have been to select the weekend of the last Saturday in August, so that in 1968[9] and 1969[10] Bank Holiday Monday actually fell in September.

A century after the 1871 Act, the Banking and Financial Dealings Act 1971, which currently regulates bank holidays in the UK, was passed.[11] The majority of the current bank holidays were specified in the 1971 Act: however New Year's Day and May Day were not introduced throughout the whole of the UK until 1974 and 1978 respectively.[12] The date of the August bank holiday was changed from the first Monday in August to the last Monday in August, and the Whitsun bank holiday (Whit Monday) was replaced by the Late Spring Bank Holiday, fixed as the last Monday in May.[13] From 1978, the final Monday of May in Scotland (a statutory holiday in the rest of the UK) and the first Monday in May in the rest of the UK (a statutory holiday in Scotland) have been proclaimed as bank holidays.[14]

In January 2007, the St Andrew's Day Bank Holiday (Scotland) Act 2007 was given royal assent, making 30 November (or the next Monday if a weekend) a bank holiday in Scotland.

Bank holidays are established in several ways:

*by statute (statutory holidays) – Holidays specifically listed in the Banking and Financial Dealings Act 1971.[20]
*by royal proclamation – Under the Banking and Financial Dealings Act 1971, bank holidays are proclaimed each year by the legal device of a royal proclamation.
*by convention (common law holidays) - Holidays established in common law (not applicable in Scotland, which does not practise common law)
Royal proclamation is also used to move bank holidays that would otherwise fall on a weekend and to create extra one-off bank holidays for special occasions.[21] The Act does not provide for a bank holiday to be suppressed by royal proclamation without appointing another day in its place.[22] In this way, public holidays are not 'lost' in years when they coincide with weekends. These deferred bank holiday days are termed a 'bank holiday in lieu' of the typical anniversary date. In the legislation they are known as 'substitute days'. The movement of the St Andrew's Day Scottish holiday to the nearest Monday when 30 November is a weekend day is statutory and does not require a proclamation.[23] Bank holidays falling on a weekend are always moved to a later date, not an earlier one.[24][25][26]

Unlike the US, where public holidays falling on a Saturday are sometimes observed on the preceding Friday, UK bank holidays are always moved to a later date, not an earlier one.

Although there is no statutory right for workers to take paid leave on bank holidays, where paid leave is given (either because the business is closed or for other reasons), the bank holiday can count towards the minimum statutory holiday entitlement. Likewise, if people are required to work on a bank holiday, there is no statutory right to an enhanced pay rate nor to a day off in lieu, although many employers do give either or both. Any rights in this respect depend on the person's contract of employment.[27] The statutory minimum paid holidays is 28 days or 5.6 weeks a year under the Working Time Regulations 1998 (including any bank holidays or public holidays that are taken).

Interesting stuff.

righthard warned for Insufficient use of requisite capital letters.

Dan
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Post #1444 - 24 Jul 2020, 21:19

dannynomates » Fri Jul 24, 2020 9:08 am wrote:
righthard » Fri Jul 24, 2020 7:35 am wrote:OMG, I'm getting very confused, could someone please just explain what the f@%k a bank holiday is in plain simple easy to understand english? please is that too much to understand or comprehend? good grief.

In England, Wales and Northern Ireland, Good Friday and Christmas Day are common law holidays, having been customary holidays since time immemorial.[3]

Until 1834, the Bank of England observed about 33 saints' days and religious festivals as holidays, but in that year this was reduced to four: 1 May (May Day), 1 November (All Saints' Day), Good Friday and Christmas Day.

The first official bank holidays were named in the Bank Holidays Act 1871, introduced by Liberal politician and banker Sir John Lubbock. [3] Under the Act, no person was compelled to make any payment or to do any act upon a bank holiday which he would not be compelled to do or make on Christmas Day or Good Friday, and the making of a payment or the doing of an act on the following day was equivalent to doing it on the holiday.[4] People were so grateful that some called the first bank holidays St Lubbock's Days for a while.

The Act did not include Good Friday and Christmas Day as bank holidays in England, Wales, or Ireland because they were already recognised as common law holidays.[3]

In 1903, the Bank Holiday (Ireland) Act added 17 March, Saint Patrick's Day, as a bank holiday for Ireland only.[6] New Year's Day did not become a bank holiday in England until 1 January 1974. Boxing Day did not become a bank holiday in Scotland until 1974.

Starting in 1965, experimentally, the August bank holiday weekend was observed at the end of August "to give a lead in extending British holidays over a longer summer period".[7] Each year's date was announced in Parliament on an ad hoc basis, to the despair of the calendar and diary publishing trade.[8] The rule seems to have been to select the weekend of the last Saturday in August, so that in 1968[9] and 1969[10] Bank Holiday Monday actually fell in September.

A century after the 1871 Act, the Banking and Financial Dealings Act 1971, which currently regulates bank holidays in the UK, was passed.[11] The majority of the current bank holidays were specified in the 1971 Act: however New Year's Day and May Day were not introduced throughout the whole of the UK until 1974 and 1978 respectively.[12] The date of the August bank holiday was changed from the first Monday in August to the last Monday in August, and the Whitsun bank holiday (Whit Monday) was replaced by the Late Spring Bank Holiday, fixed as the last Monday in May.[13] From 1978, the final Monday of May in Scotland (a statutory holiday in the rest of the UK) and the first Monday in May in the rest of the UK (a statutory holiday in Scotland) have been proclaimed as bank holidays.[14]

In January 2007, the St Andrew's Day Bank Holiday (Scotland) Act 2007 was given royal assent, making 30 November (or the next Monday if a weekend) a bank holiday in Scotland.

Bank holidays are established in several ways:

*by statute (statutory holidays) – Holidays specifically listed in the Banking and Financial Dealings Act 1971.[20]
*by royal proclamation – Under the Banking and Financial Dealings Act 1971, bank holidays are proclaimed each year by the legal device of a royal proclamation.
*by convention (common law holidays) - Holidays established in common law (not applicable in Scotland, which does not practise common law)
Royal proclamation is also used to move bank holidays that would otherwise fall on a weekend and to create extra one-off bank holidays for special occasions.[21] The Act does not provide for a bank holiday to be suppressed by royal proclamation without appointing another day in its place.[22] In this way, public holidays are not 'lost' in years when they coincide with weekends. These deferred bank holiday days are termed a 'bank holiday in lieu' of the typical anniversary date. In the legislation they are known as 'substitute days'. The movement of the St Andrew's Day Scottish holiday to the nearest Monday when 30 November is a weekend day is statutory and does not require a proclamation.[23] Bank holidays falling on a weekend are always moved to a later date, not an earlier one.[24][25][26]

Unlike the US, where public holidays falling on a Saturday are sometimes observed on the preceding Friday, UK bank holidays are always moved to a later date, not an earlier one.

Although there is no statutory right for workers to take paid leave on bank holidays, where paid leave is given (either because the business is closed or for other reasons), the bank holiday can count towards the minimum statutory holiday entitlement. Likewise, if people are required to work on a bank holiday, there is no statutory right to an enhanced pay rate nor to a day off in lieu, although many employers do give either or both. Any rights in this respect depend on the person's contract of employment.[27] The statutory minimum paid holidays is 28 days or 5.6 weeks a year under the Working Time Regulations 1998 (including any bank holidays or public holidays that are taken).

Interesting stuff.

righthard warned for Insufficient use of requisite capital letters.

Dan


Cunt. :wanker:
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Post #1445 - 24 Jul 2020, 21:35

Sonofsmegma » Fri Jul 24, 2020 9:19 pm wrote:
dannynomates » Fri Jul 24, 2020 9:08 am wrote:
righthard » Fri Jul 24, 2020 7:35 am wrote:OMG, I'm getting very confused, could someone please just explain what the f@%k a bank holiday is in plain simple easy to understand english? please is that too much to understand or comprehend? good grief.

In England, Wales and Northern Ireland, Good Friday and Christmas Day are common law holidays, having been customary holidays since time immemorial.[3]

Until 1834, the Bank of England observed about 33 saints' days and religious festivals as holidays, but in that year this was reduced to four: 1 May (May Day), 1 November (All Saints' Day), Good Friday and Christmas Day.

The first official bank holidays were named in the Bank Holidays Act 1871, introduced by Liberal politician and banker Sir John Lubbock. [3] Under the Act, no person was compelled to make any payment or to do any act upon a bank holiday which he would not be compelled to do or make on Christmas Day or Good Friday, and the making of a payment or the doing of an act on the following day was equivalent to doing it on the holiday.[4] People were so grateful that some called the first bank holidays St Lubbock's Days for a while.

The Act did not include Good Friday and Christmas Day as bank holidays in England, Wales, or Ireland because they were already recognised as common law holidays.[3]

In 1903, the Bank Holiday (Ireland) Act added 17 March, Saint Patrick's Day, as a bank holiday for Ireland only.[6] New Year's Day did not become a bank holiday in England until 1 January 1974. Boxing Day did not become a bank holiday in Scotland until 1974.

Starting in 1965, experimentally, the August bank holiday weekend was observed at the end of August "to give a lead in extending British holidays over a longer summer period".[7] Each year's date was announced in Parliament on an ad hoc basis, to the despair of the calendar and diary publishing trade.[8] The rule seems to have been to select the weekend of the last Saturday in August, so that in 1968[9] and 1969[10] Bank Holiday Monday actually fell in September.

A century after the 1871 Act, the Banking and Financial Dealings Act 1971, which currently regulates bank holidays in the UK, was passed.[11] The majority of the current bank holidays were specified in the 1971 Act: however New Year's Day and May Day were not introduced throughout the whole of the UK until 1974 and 1978 respectively.[12] The date of the August bank holiday was changed from the first Monday in August to the last Monday in August, and the Whitsun bank holiday (Whit Monday) was replaced by the Late Spring Bank Holiday, fixed as the last Monday in May.[13] From 1978, the final Monday of May in Scotland (a statutory holiday in the rest of the UK) and the first Monday in May in the rest of the UK (a statutory holiday in Scotland) have been proclaimed as bank holidays.[14]

In January 2007, the St Andrew's Day Bank Holiday (Scotland) Act 2007 was given royal assent, making 30 November (or the next Monday if a weekend) a bank holiday in Scotland.

Bank holidays are established in several ways:

*by statute (statutory holidays) – Holidays specifically listed in the Banking and Financial Dealings Act 1971.[20]
*by royal proclamation – Under the Banking and Financial Dealings Act 1971, bank holidays are proclaimed each year by the legal device of a royal proclamation.
*by convention (common law holidays) - Holidays established in common law (not applicable in Scotland, which does not practise common law)
Royal proclamation is also used to move bank holidays that would otherwise fall on a weekend and to create extra one-off bank holidays for special occasions.[21] The Act does not provide for a bank holiday to be suppressed by royal proclamation without appointing another day in its place.[22] In this way, public holidays are not 'lost' in years when they coincide with weekends. These deferred bank holiday days are termed a 'bank holiday in lieu' of the typical anniversary date. In the legislation they are known as 'substitute days'. The movement of the St Andrew's Day Scottish holiday to the nearest Monday when 30 November is a weekend day is statutory and does not require a proclamation.[23] Bank holidays falling on a weekend are always moved to a later date, not an earlier one.[24][25][26]

Unlike the US, where public holidays falling on a Saturday are sometimes observed on the preceding Friday, UK bank holidays are always moved to a later date, not an earlier one.

Although there is no statutory right for workers to take paid leave on bank holidays, where paid leave is given (either because the business is closed or for other reasons), the bank holiday can count towards the minimum statutory holiday entitlement. Likewise, if people are required to work on a bank holiday, there is no statutory right to an enhanced pay rate nor to a day off in lieu, although many employers do give either or both. Any rights in this respect depend on the person's contract of employment.[27] The statutory minimum paid holidays is 28 days or 5.6 weeks a year under the Working Time Regulations 1998 (including any bank holidays or public holidays that are taken).

Interesting stuff.

righthard warned for Insufficient use of requisite capital letters.

Dan


Cunt. :wanker:

[Warn Sonofsmegma]abusing the Chief[Moderator/Warn]

Dan
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Post #1446 - 24 Jul 2020, 23:51

dannynomates » Fri Jul 24, 2020 9:35 pm wrote:
Sonofsmegma » Fri Jul 24, 2020 9:19 pm wrote:
dannynomates » Fri Jul 24, 2020 9:08 am wrote:
righthard » Fri Jul 24, 2020 7:35 am wrote:OMG, I'm getting very confused, could someone please just explain what the f@%k a bank holiday is in plain simple easy to understand english? please is that too much to understand or comprehend? good grief.

In England, Wales and Northern Ireland, Good Friday and Christmas Day are common law holidays, having been customary holidays since time immemorial.[3]

Until 1834, the Bank of England observed about 33 saints' days and religious festivals as holidays, but in that year this was reduced to four: 1 May (May Day), 1 November (All Saints' Day), Good Friday and Christmas Day.

The first official bank holidays were named in the Bank Holidays Act 1871, introduced by Liberal politician and banker Sir John Lubbock. [3] Under the Act, no person was compelled to make any payment or to do any act upon a bank holiday which he would not be compelled to do or make on Christmas Day or Good Friday, and the making of a payment or the doing of an act on the following day was equivalent to doing it on the holiday.[4] People were so grateful that some called the first bank holidays St Lubbock's Days for a while.

The Act did not include Good Friday and Christmas Day as bank holidays in England, Wales, or Ireland because they were already recognised as common law holidays.[3]

In 1903, the Bank Holiday (Ireland) Act added 17 March, Saint Patrick's Day, as a bank holiday for Ireland only.[6] New Year's Day did not become a bank holiday in England until 1 January 1974. Boxing Day did not become a bank holiday in Scotland until 1974.

Starting in 1965, experimentally, the August bank holiday weekend was observed at the end of August "to give a lead in extending British holidays over a longer summer period".[7] Each year's date was announced in Parliament on an ad hoc basis, to the despair of the calendar and diary publishing trade.[8] The rule seems to have been to select the weekend of the last Saturday in August, so that in 1968[9] and 1969[10] Bank Holiday Monday actually fell in September.

A century after the 1871 Act, the Banking and Financial Dealings Act 1971, which currently regulates bank holidays in the UK, was passed.[11] The majority of the current bank holidays were specified in the 1971 Act: however New Year's Day and May Day were not introduced throughout the whole of the UK until 1974 and 1978 respectively.[12] The date of the August bank holiday was changed from the first Monday in August to the last Monday in August, and the Whitsun bank holiday (Whit Monday) was replaced by the Late Spring Bank Holiday, fixed as the last Monday in May.[13] From 1978, the final Monday of May in Scotland (a statutory holiday in the rest of the UK) and the first Monday in May in the rest of the UK (a statutory holiday in Scotland) have been proclaimed as bank holidays.[14]

In January 2007, the St Andrew's Day Bank Holiday (Scotland) Act 2007 was given royal assent, making 30 November (or the next Monday if a weekend) a bank holiday in Scotland.

Bank holidays are established in several ways:

*by statute (statutory holidays) – Holidays specifically listed in the Banking and Financial Dealings Act 1971.[20]
*by royal proclamation – Under the Banking and Financial Dealings Act 1971, bank holidays are proclaimed each year by the legal device of a royal proclamation.
*by convention (common law holidays) - Holidays established in common law (not applicable in Scotland, which does not practise common law)
Royal proclamation is also used to move bank holidays that would otherwise fall on a weekend and to create extra one-off bank holidays for special occasions.[21] The Act does not provide for a bank holiday to be suppressed by royal proclamation without appointing another day in its place.[22] In this way, public holidays are not 'lost' in years when they coincide with weekends. These deferred bank holiday days are termed a 'bank holiday in lieu' of the typical anniversary date. In the legislation they are known as 'substitute days'. The movement of the St Andrew's Day Scottish holiday to the nearest Monday when 30 November is a weekend day is statutory and does not require a proclamation.[23] Bank holidays falling on a weekend are always moved to a later date, not an earlier one.[24][25][26]

Unlike the US, where public holidays falling on a Saturday are sometimes observed on the preceding Friday, UK bank holidays are always moved to a later date, not an earlier one.

Although there is no statutory right for workers to take paid leave on bank holidays, where paid leave is given (either because the business is closed or for other reasons), the bank holiday can count towards the minimum statutory holiday entitlement. Likewise, if people are required to work on a bank holiday, there is no statutory right to an enhanced pay rate nor to a day off in lieu, although many employers do give either or both. Any rights in this respect depend on the person's contract of employment.[27] The statutory minimum paid holidays is 28 days or 5.6 weeks a year under the Working Time Regulations 1998 (including any bank holidays or public holidays that are taken).

Interesting stuff.

righthard warned for Insufficient use of requisite capital letters.

Dan


Cunt. :wanker:

[Warn Sonofsmegma]abusing the Chief[Moderator/Warn]

Dan

Oh dear. :laugh:
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Post #1447 - 25 Jul 2020, 00:03

I know.

If the cunt even get a warning right... :wanker:
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Post #1448 - 25 Jul 2020, 03:47

dannynonuts warned for insulting the intelligence of a rock. :huh: :huh:
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Post #1449 - 25 Jul 2020, 07:17

Mushshrooms » Sat Jul 25, 2020 3:47 am wrote:dannynonuts warned for insulting the intelligence of a rock. :huh: :huh:

Mushshrooms warned for pointing out deficiencies in the warning system.

I'll deal with the rest of you later.

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Post #1450 - 04 Aug 2020, 13:35

Cumbre Vieja on La Palma showing increased tectonic stirrings.
This is the volcano which some theories suggest could cause a massive landslide and tsunami right across the Atlantic.

This would be great because the year of our Lord 2020 has been a bit dull so far.
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Post #1451 - 05 Aug 2020, 09:40

Bye bye, London....
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Post #1452 - 05 Aug 2020, 20:09

I'm heartily sick of receiving notices from Wikipedia such as this...

Image

Clearly it has escaped their notice that it is a free encyclopedia, as they have posted above their desperate plea, so I'm afraid I cannot pay them anything as logically it would dispute the adjective "gratis".

Furthermore their claim of me paying £2 for a coffee is a nonsense as I pay that for five of those Kenco cappuccino sachets.

Dan
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Post #1453 - 05 Aug 2020, 22:56

dannynomates » Wed Aug 05, 2020 7:09 pm wrote:.....cappuccino...
Dan

I've always maintained that those greasy eyetie wog bastards should have been nuked off the face of the earth for foisting that abomination of a drink onto the rest of the world!! :grrr:
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Post #1454 - 05 Aug 2020, 23:32

Espresso grants them a reprieve, capeesh? :)
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Post #1455 - 06 Aug 2020, 00:19



Italian for molasses. :radged:
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Post #1456 - 06 Aug 2020, 01:13

:lol:

2 or 3 shots of espresso
2 shots of cream
a jigger of Kahlua
a jigger of Irish whiskey (or two)
(warm the mug before filling)
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...Zoom! There goes the gay fuckerteer chasing the tail of light.....

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...Visionary Tics Shivering In The Chest...

Post #1457 - 06 Aug 2020, 06:55

Mushshrooms » Wed Aug 05, 2020 11:56 pm wrote:
dannynomates » Wed Aug 05, 2020 7:09 pm wrote:.....cappuccino...
Dan

I've always maintained that those greasy eyetie wog bastards should have been nuked off the face of the earth for foisting that abomination of a drink onto the rest of the world!! :grrr:

Mushshrooms warned for excessive profanity and racism.

Dan
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Post #1458 - 07 Aug 2020, 15:23

Why was this picture needed to erm, brighten up, this doom and gloom article?

Couldn't be bothered to read it all. But I did Control F and didn't see dummies or manequins. :wanker2:

Image

Calm before the storm’: UK small businesses fear for their future | Free to read

https://www.ft.com/content/2bef51e5-f581-4ef5-af95-3c344ed7a238?utm_source=pocket-newtab-global-en-GB
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Post #1459 - 07 Aug 2020, 16:41

Sonofsmegma » Fri Aug 07, 2020 3:23 pm wrote:Why was this picture needed to erm, brighten up, this doom and gloom article?

Couldn't be bothered to read it all. But I did Control F and didn't see dummies or manequins. :wanker2:

Image

Calm before the storm’: UK small businesses fear for their future | Free to read

https://www.ft.com/content/2bef51e5-f581-4ef5-af95-3c344ed7a238?utm_source=pocket-newtab-global-en-GB

I wish I hadn’t read that. :wtf:
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Post #1460 - 07 Aug 2020, 19:19

I did say it was doom and gloom.

And if the FT are saying it, it might be right. :D

Doesn't affect me, dad's :wanker2: house is big and mum is gone for the most part after the last time she chucked a vodka bottle at him, so I'm home free. :)
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